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Alliance of American Football League

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  • That was very informative. Ive been wondering where to get stuff to shave my balls.

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    • Originally posted by Beacon.x View Post

      Hilarious.


      yeah, I really wish the CFL would put emphasis on downfield passing

      BAHAHAHHAHAHAHAHA
      I wish I could find video of a game in 1960 when Tobin Rote threw five TDS in one quarter..

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      • Originally posted by barefoot Bill View Post

        I wish I could find video of a game in 1960 when Tobin Rote threw five TDS in one quarter..
        Dunigan throwing for over 700 yards would work as well.

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        • Originally posted by Rocket 88 View Post

          Please explain how you can not honour a contract to pay the players while simultaneously sticking them with bills that weren't theirs and prevent them from earning a living in their chosen profession? Whether or not the CFL had an agreement with the AAF is irrelevant. The AAF's position would never survive a court challenge.
          Yeah, I'm pretty sure I would sign a contract and let them sue me. That's a roll of the dice I'd be willing to bet on.

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          • Originally posted by Andy View Post

            Yeah, I'm pretty sure I would sign a contract and let them sue me. That's a roll of the dice I'd be willing to bet on.
            I'm thinking if they aren't paying their bills, chances are they are not keeping lawyers on retainer.

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            • Originally posted by Tyree View Post

              I'm thinking if they aren't paying their bills, chances are they are not keeping lawyers on retainer.
              Actually, I'd bet that's the one bill they've paid in full.

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              • Originally posted by Andy View Post

                Actually, I'd bet that's the one bill they've paid in full.
                Possibly, but they don't come across as being that smart.

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                • https://www.si.com/nfl/2019/04/15/aa...ntent=20190415

                  It didn’t take long for the sudden collapse of the Alliance of American Football to trigger legal problems. Former AAF employees and displaced AAF players have sued the league in two lawsuits, both of which were filed in California. Tom Dundon, Charlie Ebersol, Bill Polian, Troy Polamalu and Jared Allen and others who led the AAF before it suspended operations on April 2 are also named as defendants. Meanwhile, the AAF reportedly won’t allow its former players to play in the Canadian Football League, thus setting in motion a potential legal challenge over player movement.

                  Former AAF employees: the AAF broke the law by failing to provide advanced notice of the league shutting down

                  John Swope and Jay Roberson, both of whom were assigned to business positions with the Birmingham Iron before the AAF’s nationwide layoff, have filed a lawsuit in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California (San Francisco/Oakland area). They argue that the AAF failed to follow the federal Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification Act—better known as the WARN Act or simply WARN. The two men seek class certification so that they could represent other dismissed AAF employees.

                  Swope and Roberson are represented by three Alabama attorneys, Lee Winston, Roderick Cooks and Byron Perkins. The trio drafted the plaintiffs’ complaint and will take on the AAF, or whatever is left of it, near the league’s headquarters in San Francisco.

                  Employers with at least 100 employees are generally required to follow WARN, which obligates businesses to provide employees at least 60 days’ written notice of closings or mass layoffs. Failure to follow WARN can lead to court-ordered back pay and benefits for up to 60 days. WARN can also trigger fines of up to $500 per day.

                  The AAF’s startlingly short history highlights the importance of the 60-day window. The AAF effectively shut down on April 2, meaning if WARN applies, the AAF had to provide notice of the impending closure by Feb. 1. That, of course, did not happen. The AAF’s Week 1 games started Feb. 9 and were nationally broadcast on CBS, earning TV ratings that eclipsed those of the NBA on ABC. A notice of closing or layoffs would have overshadowed any ratings accomplishment.

                  AAF employees would contend that the league’s financial problems and organizational woes were apparent long before Week 1 and ought to have compelled AAF executives to provide advanced notice. Many of those employees started their jobs in the fall of 2018 and thus had first-hand knowledge of the AAF’s chaotic state. Those problems came to public light within days of Week 1 when reports of the AAF potentially failing to meet payroll obligations surfaced.

                  Disputes over league ownership also emerged. The AAF is a single entity sports league, meaning the league owns all of the teams. Therefore, every player, coach and staff member worked not for any one AAF team but for the AAF itself. In February, venture capitalist Robert Vanech sued Charlie Ebersol. Ebersol and Polian are identified as the co-founders of the AAF and both enjoyed leadership positions. Vanech, however, argues that he co-conceived of the AAF and is entitled to a 50% stake. The ownership battle was another sign of turbulent waters for the AAF.

                  It appeared that the AAF was rescued in mid-February when Dundon, a Dallas-based billionaire who also owns the Carolina Hurricanes, pledged a $250 million investment in the AAF. He then became the league’s chairman. However, there remains uncertainty over whether Dundon gained absolute authority over the AAF or whether decisions had to be made through consensus with Ebersol, Polian and other league executives.

                  At the time of his arrival, Dundon’s public remarks assured fans—and, more importantly, AAF players and other AAF employees—that the league’s future was secure. “There’s a difference between commitments and funding,” Dundon told media in February. “They had the commitments to last a long time, but maybe not the money in the bank. My money is in my bank. I’m sure of it … That’s enough money to run this league for a long time. We’re good for many years to come with what I just did.”

                  Six weeks later, the AAF abruptly suspended all operations. There are rumors that Dundon’s decision to invest in the AAF was pretextual: while he publicly claimed a desire to fund and sustain a pro football league, he may have been more interested in a supposedly innovative sports betting app being developed by AAF employees. Some persons familiar with the app and its data are skeptical of this suspicion. For one, the app may not have been all that innovative. For another, MGM Resorts International, rather than the AAF, may own the app’s intellectual property due to a contract between the resort and the AAF.

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                  • The AAF is just a shameful piece of **** that is now holding its players hostage when it comes to the CFL. It's just disgusting. These players, such as Ciante Evans, are now hostage to contracts in a league that isn't even operating anymore and will never operate again.

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                    • Originally posted by Rider_Stronson View Post
                      The AAF is just a shameful piece of **** that is now holding its players hostage when it comes to the CFL. It's just disgusting. These players, such as Ciante Evans, are now hostage to contracts in a league that isn't even operating anymore and will never operate again.
                      I hope it serves as an eye opener to some of the players to not be so quick to jump to a new league. But then again, I am sure the players were being fed the same string of BS that everyone else was as far as financial stability.

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                      • The CFL are being wimps for waiting for AAF bankruptcy proceedings to play out before allowing CFL teams to sign former AAF players. AAF contracts are worthless and the AAF is in no position to take legal action against the CFL. What are they going to do? Hire lawyers in Canada to sue the CFL on their behalf? That would take a lot of upfront paid in advance cash that the AAf does not have.

                        So what is the CFL really doing. Are they playing hard ball and teaching a lesson to players who chose the AAF over the CFL? It almost seems that way.
                        Last edited by DanoT; 04-15-2019, 08:35 PM.
                        Lionbacker

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                        • Originally posted by DanoT View Post
                          The CFL are being wimps for waiting for AAF bankruptcy proceedings to play out before allowing CFL teams to sign former AAF players. AAF contracts are worthless and the AAF is in no position to take legal action against the CFL. What are they going to do? Hire lawyers in Canada to sue the CFL on their behalf? That would take a lot of upfront paid in advance cash that the AAf does not have.

                          So what is the CFL really doing. Are they playing hard ball and teaching a lesson to players who chose the AAF over the CFL? It almost seems that way.
                          Why would the CFL rush to sign players while camp is still a ways away and they have no CBA? Teams already put the guys they want on the neglist. They can afford to wait to get them under contract.

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by DanoT View Post
                            The CFL are being wimps for waiting for AAF bankruptcy proceedings to play out before allowing CFL teams to sign former AAF players. AAF contracts are worthless and the AAF is in no position to take legal action against the CFL. What are they going to do? Hire lawyers in Canada to sue the CFL on their behalf? That would take a lot of upfront paid in advance cash that the AAf does not have.

                            So what is the CFL really doing. Are they playing hard ball and teaching a lesson to players who chose the AAF over the CFL? It almost seems that way.
                            Maybe Tony Merchant would take the case.

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by gilligan View Post

                              Why would the CFL rush to sign players while camp is still a ways away and they have no CBA? Teams already put the guys they want on the neglist. They can afford to wait to get them under contract.
                              Why wouldn't the CFL let each team decide on its own if there are former AAF players that they might be interested in, rather than the current CFL mandated hands off the AAF.
                              Lionbacker

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by DanoT View Post

                                Why wouldn't the CFL let each team decide on its own if there are former AAF players that they might be interested in, rather than the current CFL mandated hands off the AAF.
                                CFL teams already put players on the neg list, so teams already have locked up the rights to the ones they're interested in. They're just not signing players who aren't yet free agents.

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