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2018 CFL TV Ratings

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  • Originally posted by CFLFAN1 View Post

    The CFL hasn't entertained offers for their TV rights for 20 years or longer. CBC/Global complained they would have bid higher than TSN but weren't allowed to bid. Rogers said they wanted to bid. The CFL wants TSN. Period. TSN is the most successful and profitable specialty channel in Canada and are 20% owned by ESPN, providing some synergies there. TSN does an exceptional job for the CFL and the league would never risk that relationship. Money isn't the driving factor. So what if some two-bit station bids higher, the teams would just spend the extra money on higher salaries. If the TV revenue is lower, the teams can cut salaries a bit. Canadian football will still trundle along like they've done for a 100 years or longer.

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    • Originally posted by Bigsexydawg View Post

      That game where Reggie Hunt broke the record for tackles in a game against the Bombers and Westwood hit that long field goal on the last play of the game wasn't televised. Also Shepherd and crew got a PPV for a game in BC in 2003 I believe that was not going to be televised.
      That was back in MSN Messenger days. Chaps turned his webcam to his TV and put it on Messenger for all of us out of province people to watch it. Normally it's not football on the screen when a bunch of guys are huddled around a computer screen on a Sat night.

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      • Originally posted by CFLFAN1 View Post

        The CFL hasn't entertained offers for their TV rights for 20 years or longer. CBC/Global complained they would have bid higher than TSN but weren't allowed to bid. Rogers said they wanted to bid. The CFL wants TSN. Period. TSN is the most successful and profitable specialty channel in Canada and are 20% owned by ESPN, providing some synergies there. TSN does an exceptional job for the CFL and the league would never risk that relationship. Money isn't the driving factor. So what if some two-bit station bids higher, the teams would just spend the extra money on higher salaries. If the TV revenue is lower, the teams can cut salaries a bit. Canadian football will still trundle along like they've done for a 100 years or longer.
        I believe CBC wanted to cherry pick games and the CFL wanted nothing to do with that.

        TSN was the only outfit that would televise every game.

        I think attitudes have changed in the broadcasting.

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        • Originally posted by CalgaryRiderFan View Post

          That was back in MSN Messenger days. Chaps turned his webcam to his TV and put it on Messenger for all of us out of province people to watch it. Normally it's not football on the screen when a bunch of guys are huddled around a computer screen on a Sat night.
          I seem to remember laying on my futon in the office watching a game vs Hamilton on my computer too. Thank god for 20" screens.

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          • Originally posted by CalgaryRiderFan View Post

            You only have to go back to about 2005 to go to a time when not all games were televised.
            Truthfully, I don't recall, so I'll take your word for it. In saying that, the only way I see that happening again is if the ratings continue to drop and reach MLS levels. It could happen I suppose, but I think we're at least another 5 years away from that. Admittedly, it wouldn't really bother me though, because I rarely watch none Argo games now, but I'd just rather not see the League waste time with TSN anymore. I get a lot of people love TSN because they gave them the "big" tv deal, and air all the games, but since 2014 IMO TSN is no longer the behemoth they were, and the CFL has been treated like the red headed stepchild in comparison to the NFL. Which isn't surprising when you consider that Canada is the only Country in the World where Foreign tv programming make up the vast majority of Canadian tv highest ratings (minus Quebec of course).

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            • An interesting look..TSN vs SN

              https://torontosportsmedia.com/2019/...019-economics/

              I am not the sharpest tool in the shed, but looking at this it would seem the CFL is worth something.

              This is the final instalment of a series on sports media stories to watch in 2019. Thanks to everyone who weighed in on part one (on the future of Damien Cox) and part two (on podcasting and the future of conventional radio).



              Part three focuses on the evolving economics of sports media in Toronto, and to a larger extent in Canada. In this post we will cover where the biggest changes are coming and which segments of the industry are most vulnerable. As always, comments and corrections welcome below. The Network Wars

              Over the past several years we have grown accustomed to duelling press releases by Sportsnet and TSN, with each claiming victory as the #1 something or other. However in each of the past three years Sportsnet has claimed for itself the prestigious title of “most watched specialty network”. The 2017 victory lap was described as follows:
              “For the period of January 1 to December 31, 2017, all Sportsnet networks collectively delivered a 5.2audience share and an average minute audience of 193,000, marking a 29% lead over its closest competitor”


              A year later, TSN claimed the title for 2018:
              “TSN remains Canada’s most-watched specialty network in 2018, as the average audience of the network’s five national feeds lead those of its closest competitor by +13%”


              A naive reader could be forgiven for becoming confused about how TSN “remains” #1 if SN was #1 the previous year. Both press releases cite the same source: Numeris, the industry’s self-created measurement monster. Their process involves taking the ratings for every channel for every week of the year and then dividing that to generate an “average audience”.



              When you factor in offsetting programming like highlights shows, desk shows, game reruns, and radio on TV, a lot of the week yields negligible ratings gains over the competition. The real advantage comes from live programming. The higher the number of big games on your network over the year, the better chance of winning the average audience trophy at the end of 52 weeks.



              If you do the math on the two press releases you end up with the following averages (note: both networks employ Hollywood math, as explained here, so don’t take these numbers as absolutely factual):



              SN: 2017 = 193,000 ; 2018 = 152,000

              TSN: 2017 = 150,000 ; 2018 = 172,000



              If you zoom out a little it looks like this:



              SN: 2015 = 159,000 ; 2016 = 166,000 ; 2017 = 193,000 ; 2018 = 152,000

              TSN: 2015 = 141,000 ; 2016 = 144,000 ; 2017 = 150,000 ; 2018 = 172,000



              We can certainly debate what these numbers mean, but one thing is now clear: getting the NHL deal has not put Sportsnet in the clear #1 position.

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