Welcome!

Welcome to our community forums, full of great people, ideas and excitement. Please register if you would like to take part.

Register

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

2nd Boeing 737-8 crash

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Originally posted by RFIOttawa View Post

    It will no doubt be taking further beating once the airlines starting to cancel the order which already started with Indonesia Garuda Air (due to "consumer's lost of confidence in the plane"). It will take some times for them to regain this consumer's trust and confidence regardless of the outcome of the investigation.
    And thanks to the actions of the US government against Bombardier, the biggest beneficially in all of this will be Airbus. Airbus was already their biggest competitor, but Bombardier's C-Series competes with the 737 model as well, especially for short haul flights. US protectionism meant to hurt Bombardier and help Boeing pushed Bombardier right into Airbus' arms.

    More and more the world will look to Europe for leadership rather than the US. The FAA used to be the agency everyone looked to. That trust been lost, perhaps permanently.

    Comment


    • Boeing biggest problem will be if they sold these by saying their is minimal training required for 737 neo pilots, while at the same time adding a system that required detailed knowledge to operate safely.

      They might be able to argue that good pilots following procedure could have saved these airplanes, but that is very difficult if you told them in advance that little training was required.

      Comment


      • Originally posted by voice of reason View Post
        Boeing biggest problem will be if they sold these by saying their is minimal training required for 737 neo pilots, while at the same time adding a system that required detailed knowledge to operate safely.

        They might be able to argue that good pilots following procedure could have saved these airplanes, but that is very difficult if you told them in advance that little training was required.
        It was reported today that transition training to the max series was a 2 1/2 online course.

        Comment


        • Originally posted by voice of reason View Post
          Boeing biggest problem will be if they sold these by saying their is minimal training required for 737 neo pilots, while at the same time adding a system that required detailed knowledge to operate safely.

          They might be able to argue that good pilots following procedure could have saved these airplanes, but that is very difficult if you told them in advance that little training was required.
          My understanding is that the checklist in place for the regular 737 would take them down the path that would end in them shutting off the auto trim. They felt this would solve any issues. In this way they were able to sell the plane as not needing a lot of training so that buyers would see it as an economical purchase.

          Comment


          • Originally posted by DJR View Post

            My understanding is that the checklist in place for the regular 737 would take them down the path that would end in them shutting off the auto trim. They felt this would solve any issues. In this way they were able to sell the plane as not needing a lot of training so that buyers would see it as an economical purchase.
            Boeing also wasn't forthcoming to the FAA about exactly how much the MCAS could adjust the trim and how often - what they told FAA was completely inaccurate. FAA approved the abbreviated training based on false information provided by Boeing. Boeing will be doing well if they can avoid criminal charges out of this never mind stock value. FAA will have its own explaining to do on this whole "regulate yourself" process.

            Comment


            • Originally posted by go riders View Post

              Look at the car industry. Seat belts use to be an option. How long was ABS not standard?
              We used to smoke in Planes too.

              In todays world, vehicles are all about safety and not an option.

              Click image for larger version

Name:	julie-hagerty-300x225.jpg?resize=320:*.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	21.7 KB
ID:	422786

              Comment


              • Originally posted by Magnum View Post

                We used to smoke in Planes too.

                In todays world, vehicles are all about safety and not an option.

                Click image for larger version

Name:	julie-hagerty-300x225.jpg?resize=320:*.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	21.7 KB
ID:	422786
                I suppose you're right, but how many people died before they no longer made these safety features an option? Seatbelts, collapsing steering columns, air bags, abs brakes, etc

                Comment


                • Originally posted by The_G View Post

                  I suppose you're right, but how many people died before they no longer made these safety features an option? Seatbelts, collapsing steering columns, air bags, abs brakes, etc
                  How many people wore seatbelts before it became law?

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by Magnum View Post

                    We used to smoke in Planes too.

                    In todays world, vehicles are all about safety and not an option.
                    Seatbelts are still not mandatory on buses...

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by Guillermo View Post

                      Boeing also wasn't forthcoming to the FAA about exactly how much the MCAS could adjust the trim and how often - what they told FAA was completely inaccurate. FAA approved the abbreviated training based on false information provided by Boeing. Boeing will be doing well if they can avoid criminal charges out of this never mind stock value. FAA will have its own explaining to do on this whole "regulate yourself" process.
                      Not only the software, they also need to look at the reliability and MTBF of those crucial AoA sensors . Probably manufacturing from outsource 3rd world country

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by RFIOttawa View Post

                        Not only the software, they also need to look at the reliability and MTBF of those crucial AoA sensors . Probably manufacturing from outsource 3rd world country
                        There are two "sensors" so there is backup on board. However they only read one as the extra complexity of reading both would mean extra training costs for the buyers.

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by Shotgun

                          Is there due diligence on Boeing’s part to ensure a buyer is qualified???
                          They drop the buyers cheque on a desk - if it doesn't bounce they are qualified.

                          Comment


                          • FAA Eyes Consensus On 737 MAX Flight Approvals

                            Looks like its safe to fly in a Max "again". I wonder how many changes they have completed...

                            Sad that they can't be the first one to lift the operation ban because of a false narrative driven by social media pressure.

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by RiderHard View Post
                              FAA Eyes Consensus On 737 MAX Flight Approvals

                              Looks like its safe to fly in a Max "again". I wonder how many changes they have completed...

                              Sad that they can't be the first one to lift the operation ban because of a false narrative driven by social media pressure.
                              It seems safety was an option.

                              https://www.timescolonist.com/air-ca...nes-1.23670838

                              No teacher, cake are square, pie are round.

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by jenius View Post
                                Boeing should be embarrassed and ashamed that this was “optional”. The lawsuits they are going to face from this will be massive.

                                For crying out loud, they push an airplane that’s going to be the “next workhorse of the skies” and they have a pricing package that people can upgrade too that helps ensure it won’t crash?

                                Comment

                                Announcement

                                Collapse
                                No announcement yet.

                                Announcement

                                Collapse
                                No announcement yet.
                                Working...
                                X