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To sous or not to sous?

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  • Originally posted by juice View Post

    I have done beef roasts (including one tri-tip), pork butt, and ribs. I don't keep notes, so any info would be from memory, but feel free to ask any specific questions you have.

    I don't know if overnight will be long enough to make that much difference on a brisket. You might need 24-36 hours in the bath. But from what I've read online, the beauty is you can bath it whenever, then chill it and smoke it back up to temp anytime, only needing a few hours on the smoker. Which I believe is what you're looking for. You also don't need to take it all the way up around 200į to get similar (perhaps even better?) results.
    How long do you do beef roasts for? I did one for 28 hours and wasnít happy with the results. Iím thinking it was too short as the roast was a bit chewy. It was also a bit pink for our liking so next time Iíll up the temp as well.

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    • Originally posted by d-slice View Post

      How long do you do beef roasts for? I did one for 28 hours and wasnít happy with the results. Iím thinking it was too short as the roast was a bit chewy. It was also a bit pink for our liking so next time Iíll up the temp as well.
      Depends on the roast. A lean sirloin tip is good with 24-30 hours, but something like a chuck or blade, with lots of connective tissue, needs 48 hours or more. The one I did at Christmas for my family I left in for about 70 hours and it had the texture of a good prime rib.
      Is it May yet?

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      • Originally posted by juice View Post

        Depends on the roast. A lean sirloin tip is good with 24-30 hours, but something like a chuck or blade, with lots of connective tissue, needs 48 hours or more. The one I did at Christmas for my family I left in for about 70 hours and it had the texture of a good prime rib.
        Thanks for the info. It was a blade so that would be my problem. I will try it again for much longer next time!

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        • I went to a buddy's house for a pot-luck Super Bowl party. I decided to go with dry garlic ribs. I bought 4 racks of back ribs and had the butcher rip them down the middle to emulate spare ribs in size but meatier. I separated them individually and vacuum sealed them with garlic. Sous vide at 150 for three hours and then on a rack to dry. Quick toss in some flour, garlic salt and onion powder then into hot oil for 3 minutes at 375. They came out amazing. Crispy outside, very moist inside and garlic flavour with a nice golden appearance. Served with lemon wedges. One of my friends' wives thought they were store bought.
          2018 YNOT Champ

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          • I got one for Christmas, used it on some steaks, chicken, fish and veggies (potatoes...just because...). I didn't cook the potatoes long enough so that's on me. However the steak was awesome cooked medium rare and seared on a cast iron (probably will do the bbq in the summer). Fish was good, super juicy but it was hard to get out of the bag without breaking apart so you had to be gentle with it. But it seared up nicely (on cast iron) and was really good. The star was chicken though...I usually buy a whole fryer chicken and then cut it into parts. I cooked them, then seared on cast iron and tossed into the oven on broil for about 5 mins to crisp up the skin. I've never had better chicken... What I'd like to do next is cold smoke chicken prior to the sous vide process and then broil at the end.

            I've just been cooking them in ziploc bag and push it down into the water and then seal up the top. Gets most of the air out although I'd like to have a small vaccum pump that could draw out a bit more air and then easily seal the bag.

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            • Originally posted by riderphan View Post
              So I've had about a week to play around and get used to my machine's operation somewhat. I have focused primarily on proteins but also did a broccoli and cheese dish that was well received by my family.

              I'll give you a bit of my background so you can decide whether or not to give my post any consideration.

              I enjoy cooking as a hobby but also do all of the cooking in our household. My number one goal is always to put out the absolute best quality end result possible no matter the amount of time, cost, or effort. I make tonkhotsu ramen broth over three days to achieve the flavour I want using bison and pork bones. I have a Brinkman propane grill, a Traeger Lil Tex pellet "grill", a Weber Smokey Mountain 22, a Weber Kettle, and a Little Chief smoker. If you think grilling and barbecuing are the same thing we probably can't be friends. Around this time last year I smoked 4 whole hogs at the same time on a warship sailing home from Hawaii (60 pounders not 200s). I use Weber charcoal for smoking and generally prefer pecan or white oak chunks, then apple, pear, cherry, hickory, mesquite, alder, and avocado. I am presently looking for a 1000 gallon propane tank that I can make into a stick burner. Please PM me if you know someone who has an old one ready to become a pit.

              After being unhappy with the tenderness of my first steak effort and some advice from people here I went back at it hoping to improve the result. I re-did a strip loin sealed with rosemary and garlic and went for 2.5 hours at 130, then seared a crust on it with a cast iron skillet. I was quite pleased with the texture and infused flavour but did miss the smoke a bit. For the next one I think I'll sear on the Weber kettle with some smoke. (I cannot bring myself to use liquid smoke for anything other than turkey brine)

              For New Year's Eve we had a couple friends over and I decided to make wings. I went with a cross between Poc-Poc and Korean bbq style. The glaze had soy, mirin, brown sugar, fish sauce, garlic, ginger, hoisin, gochujang and grape jam. The toppings were finely chopped chives, cilantro, sriracha aoli, wasabi-lime yogourt, toasted white and black sesame seeds, and some crushed peanuts.

              I sous vis'd about 4 pounds of wings at 155 for about 3 hours. I'll be honest, when I took them out to dry and cool I didn't get a warm fuzzy about the whole operation. They were kind of a big gelatinous lump that had to be separated and sort of reminded me of headcheese. Despite my reservations I decided to proceed and see what they'd turn out like.

              Once it was just about time to eat I brought a few litres of peanut oil to 375 and started dropping them in batches. I was just eyeballing them for colour and texture but guess it was about 4.5 minutes in the oil for the colour I wanted.

              A quick roll around in the glaze and then sprinkled with the toppings and served. I was amazed at how well they turned out. To have the perfect crispy crunch on the outside while maintaining a moist and juicy interior was something I've never seen before. These were by far the best wings I've ever made and were right up there with some of the best I've ever had. I will be making them again and I honestly don't know if I would change anything, which is a rarity for me.

              I'm thinking of doing a brisket on the WSM this weekend but plan on overnighting it via sous vide at 135 before going on the smoker. If I could knock off 8 or 10 hours of time on the smoker and get the same results I'd be all for it. Has anyone here done a butt, tri-tip, beef plate ribs, or brisket in the bath before smoking? Any wisdom from experience is appreciated.
              Do you know how big a 1000 gallon tank is? They are about 15 feet long and about 3 feet in diameter. If you are cooking that much I'll take an invite.

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              • Originally posted by Sofaking View Post

                Do you know how big a 1000 gallon tank is? They are about 15 feet long and about 3 feet in diameter. If you are cooking that much I'll take an invite.
                I intend to cut a section out of the middle to provide material for vents, handles, chimney etc. In the end it will be closer in size to a 500 and on a trailer.

                I have spent countless hours dragging anhydrous tanks around and staring at a 1000 gallon propane tank feeding a grain dryer so yes, I am aware of what I'm asking.

                There were 2x 5000 gallon propane tanks recently sold near Cypress Hills. They were around 40 feet long.
                Last edited by riderphan; 02-07-2019, 08:06 AM.
                2018 YNOT Champ

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                • Originally posted by riderphan View Post

                  I intend to cut a section out of the middle to provide material for vents, handles, chimney etc. In the end it will be closer in size to a 500 and on a trailer.

                  I have spent countless hours dragging anhydrous tanks around and staring at a 1000 gallon propane tank feeding a grain dryer so yes, I am aware of what I'm asking.

                  There were 2x 5000 gallon propane tanks recently sold near Cypress Hills. They were around 40 feet long.
                  That is a serious smoker I will give you that. What is your plan for Grates?

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                  • Originally posted by Sofaking View Post

                    That is a serious smoker I will give you that. What is your plan for Grates?
                    I'm going to put large flat slide in racks on one side(big enough to do a whole hog) and chain driven rotating racks on the fire box side.
                    2018 YNOT Champ

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                    • Originally posted by riderphan View Post

                      I'm going to put large flat slide in racks on one side(big enough to do a whole hog) and chain driven rotating racks on the fire box side.
                      With a project that ambitious you could also consider adding a spit to do a whole hog. That outfit would have some versatility and be in demand.

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